Clatter Clatter Clackity Clack

by Rachel on January 28, 2013

Rhythm Sticks Chant

Rhythm sticks are one of those instruments I find myself including in music therapy sessions over and over again, because they can be used to address so many different skills.

For that same reason, they have been a staple in my early childhood music classes throughout the years. And since I use them so often, it should come as no surprise that I have written and adapted LOTS of songs exclusively for rhythm sticks.

My most recent sticks-inspired song is actually a chant (although it could easily be set to a melody, which I may decide to do in the future). It’s short and to the point — the idea is to have children listen to a rhythm I play, and then play that rhythm back.

Just as I did in the recording, I keep my rhythms very brief and uncomplicated since the children I’m working with are very young. But I could also envision using this chant with older students, making the rhythms more difficult. Another idea would be to ask students to take turns being the “leader” and come up with their own rhythms for everyone else to repeat.

Do you rock the rhythm sticks, too? Tomorrow I’ll be sharing some more songs I use to accompany all that clacking and tapping…see you then!



Songbook: Tapping, Shaking, Music Making!

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

nick garcia January 28, 2013 at 1:28 pm

For me music has always been a constant companion. It relaxes,keeps me mellow cheers me up.. I was amazed when I came across your page a few years back and discovered all the applications with music you have orchestrated.. All good, all positive, all helping.. I thank you for the work you are doing and the lives you are touching.

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Molly Bishop, MT-BC January 29, 2013 at 8:06 am

A great chant – thanks! I also use rhythm sticks a lot in my early childhood classes. Definitely a favorite instrument! I am curious – how young have you used this chant successfully?

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